Jane Dunlap - New England R. E. Center, Inc.



Posted by Jane Dunlap on 2/17/2019

It is always a beautiful and joyous feeling when you make an offer for a home, and the seller accepts it. However, you shouldn’t be in haste to pay the seller yet. Don’t be tempted to cut corners either by neglecting professional home inspection services all in a bid to reduce cost. Skipping home inspection should never be made because it will save you lots of headaches later on.

1. More Bargaining Power

A professional home inspection should reveal faults, or perhaps potential issues with the house. Knowledge gives you more bargaining power to ask for repairs or better yet, a reduction in the house price as compensation. But without such a professional inspection, you negotiate blindly, and when the deal is sealed, you find yourself paying additional money on things you know nothing of in the future.

2. For Safety

Here is another valid reason why you shouldn’t skip a home inspection no matter the reason. Getting an inspection on your home provides you with peace of mind. The home inspector will check the house for carbon monoxide, mold, and radon. If any of these toxic or harmful substances are present, that is enough reason to pull out of the deal.

3. Insurance

Most insurance companies require certificates like wind mitigation and four-point inspection before you can finally be insured. If home insurance is one of the things you plan to do, make sure a professional home inspection is done in other to get those necessary certificates.

4. Protecting the House

The core functions of a professional home inspector aren't only to discover faults, as many assume. They can also offer tips on how to keep the house safe. Having a report definitely will save you a lot of money in return.

5. Future Cost Forecast

Another excellent reason to not skip home inspection is the insights to the future. A good home inspector can determine how long the plumbing will last, and also, the duration of the heaters or coolers before they stop functioning. With this insight, you can plan and negotiate properly with your seller.

6. Illegal Additions or Installation

In every region, there are building codes and regulations to which homeowners must abide. Otherwise, it will have a drastically negative impact on insurance, taxes, usability and overall value of the house. Through home inspections, rooms, garages or basements completed illegally will be exposed.

The advantages of not skipping home inspection are tremendous. To save yourself from future headaches, spend on a professional home inspection today. There are lots of licensed home inspectors in your locality, hire one before closing that new house deal.




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Posted by Jane Dunlap on 1/21/2018

Credit plays an important role in your ability to secure a home loan and to qualify for a low-interest mortgage. However, many first-time homebuyers aren’t aren’t sure about the exact relationship between credit scores and mortgages.

This doesn’t come as much of a surprise considering the many factors that go into your credit score and into your lender’s decision to approve you for a mortgage. So, in this article, we’re going to cover three commonly asked questions that homebuyers have about credit scores and how they’re used by mortgage lenders to determine your eligibility for a home loan.

Will my credit score go down if I check my credit report?

If you’re thinking of buying a home in the near future, one of the first things you’ll want to do is check your credit. However, if you’ve heard that some credit inquiries briefly lower your credit score you might be hesitant to find out.


This common misconception stems from the fact that taking out new lines of credit results in a temporary decrease in your credit score. The difference between checking your credit and a credit inquiry is simple: a credit check you can access for free online through a service like Credit Karma, whereas a credit inquiry is performed by a lender or creditor with whom you’ve applied for credit.

In short, checking your credit score online won’t affect your score. In fact, the major credit bureaus are required to allow you to check your credit for free once per year.

Can I get a loan with low credit?

Increasing your credit score is a lengthy process that requires careful financial management. Many people who have had difficulties paying off bills, loans, and credit cards will have to rebuild their credit. Or, if you’re young and don’t have a diverse history of credit payments, you’ll be starting from scratch to build your score.

If you’re hoping to get an FHA (first-time homeowner loan), the lowest your score can be is 580. However, that doesn’t mean you should always take a loan with a low credit score. When you don’t have a good credit history, lenders will seek other ways to guarantees their investment. This comes in the form of higher interest rates or PMI (private mortgage insurance) which you’ll have to pay on top of your monthly home insurance and mortgage payments.

Will applying for a home loan affect my credit?

Simply stated, yes. However, applying for a loan or get preapproved is considered a credit inquiry and won’t leave any lasting negative on your credit score. Making several inquiries within a short period of time, however, can significantly lower your score, so choose your inquiries wisely. And, be sure to monitor your credit score on a monthly basis so you have an idea of where you stand along the road to applying for a home loan.




Tags: Buying a home   FAQ   homebuyers  
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